Nitehawk: Not a Movie, a Movie Theatre

nitehawk-marquee

Rendering of the marquee of the new Nitehawk Prospect Park theatre.

Already something of a fixture in central Williamsburg, the owners of the dine-in movie house Nitehawk are giving a $10-million overhaul to Park Slope’s old Sanders Theatre (more recently the Pavilion), on Bartel-Pritchard Square at the Northwest corner of Prospect Park, and later this year the Nitehawk Prospect Park will open, with first-run, classic, rare, and independent movies onscreen and drinks and dinner delivered to your table. We can’t wait. 

Looby Rendering 300w

Rendering of the restaurant under a screening room in the Nitehawk Prospect Park. Architects: Think! Architecture and Design.

The new Nitehawk will have seven screening rooms, vs. the three at the Williamsburg venue, and four of those will have 35-mm projectors, allowing for the screening of rarely shown films that are not available in today’s more common 70-mm and digital formats. And, there’s the food. Besides popcorn, you’ll be able to watch the movie while eating from a menu offering such non-traditional movie noshes as spinach-artichoke empanadas, paella risotto balls, and burrata crostini, which features roasted acorn squash and poached pears; or try a specialty item like the I, Tonya, made with shredded pork knee (ouch!), American cheese, and gremolata aioli. The owner of the Nitehawk,  Matthew Viragh, plans to offer a menu that’s different, but not unlike, the offerings in Williamsburg, so there should be more filling entrees like the sausage and pepper hoagie, the meatloaf sandwich, the Nitehawk burger, and the fried chicken sandwich. For drinks, there’s coke and root beer, and also a well-stocked assortment of whiskeys, scotches, tequilas, rums, and more. Wait service takes your order before or during the movie, and a good time is had by all.

Renovations are well underway at the Sanders, a landmarked building originally built in 1928 to replace the Marathon Theatre (opened1908). The 1,516-seat Sanders had a fifty-year run as a movie and vaudeville house. The Pavilion opened in 1996 as a three-screen multi-plex, and in the early 2000s underwent a second renovation, carved into nine screens.

Sanders Theatre ext 300w
The Sanders Theatre, from long ago, via Cinema Treasures.

The building was sold in 2006 and the new owners, Hidrock Realty, devised plans to build a six-story condominium over the theatre and the adjacent one-story building (that once housed The Park House Restaurant and then Circle’s bar and Mexican restaurant), a plan eventually approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC). The owners of the Nitehawk approached Hidrock about replacing the Pavilion, and in 2016 Hidrock sold the theatre to 188 Prospect Park West LLC, which immediately announced the closing of the Pavilion and the coming of the Nitehawk. Leading the renovation is Think! Architecture and Design, headquartered in Metrotech. The LPC has just approved a new marquee sign proclaiming the Nitehawk. 

 

At a time when digital viewing on multiple devices has taken over our consciousness, it’s getting harder and harder to find any outlet showing the many, many great films that have not yet been and perhaps never will be digitized. We’re excited that the Nitehawk is working to expand the number of venues for such films, and we plan on taking advantage of them, and the burrata crostini, too!


 

East Brooklyn—Ready for Prime Time, or Not Quite?

It’s been almost two years since a rezoning of Brooklyn’s East New York neighborhood jump-started a wave of speculation and, to a lesser degree, development throughout the area and sent a shudder of gentrification worry down the backs of those already living there. Last summer, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams called for next-door Brownsville to be similarly rezoned to attract new affordable housing to that neighborhood. So, how’s it all working?

dcp_overview_map_05102016 from NYC gov

A map of the East New York Rezoning District during planning. The final boundaries are almost identical.

 

The initial rezoning of East New York came out of a plan by Mayor Bill De Blasio to rezone about fifteen neighborhoods throughout the city, also including Bushwick and Gowanus in Brooklyn. To rezone any neighborhood, the NYC Economic Development Corporation (EDC) is charged with studying each neighborhood and submitting proposals to the city council for approval. So far in Brooklyn, only the East New York proposal has been approved.  Elsewhere around the city, plans have been approved for East Harlem and Far Rockaway.

Brownsville Library, via Historic Districts Council

The Brownsville Library Building

As a part of the rezoning plans, the mayor and city council included a mandatory inclusion housing rule (MIH), requiring all residential development in each zone have a certain percentage of rental units be offered at below market rates, based on several formulas that can be imposed by the city council. A few developers that specialize in what is considered affordable housing by those for whom affordable is not an issue have taken advantage of as many of the city’s available subsidies as possible. Those that accept the subsidies must set aside many of the units for affordable housing units. How much the rents will be will depend on which subsidy the developer takes.

Since the rezoning, for-sale prices in East Brooklyn (East New York, Brownsville, and Cypress Hills) have risen sharply, and several developments are underway. According to an article months ago at citylimits.org, prices had risen from about $35 per square foot before the rezoning to over $40 per square foot by July 2017. And, mortgages have become harder to get for low-income buyers since the rezoning.

Mixed Use, Pitkin Ave cropped

Pitkin Avenue, East New York, showing a strip of mixed-use properties.

There has been a small rash of speculation, with investors buying property in the hopes of making redevelopment moves in the future. Much of that activity has taken place peripherally to the rezoned area, with the speculators hoping to avoid the MIH restrictions should the area really take off. But many owners have overpriced their properties, and those are sitting on the market with no nibbles.

So, two years into the rezoning, the amount of actual development is meager. Despite the activity just described, the overall jump-in rate is small. East Brooklyn, it seems, isn’t quite ready for a wholesale boom like downtown or even the low-rise efforts burgeoning on the Fort Greene/Clinton Hill corridor along Lafayette and Dekalb Avenues.

Typical ENY Block cropped

Like most of Brooklyn, Brownsville, East New York,, and Cypress Hills holds a mix of single-family, multi-family, and apartment block buildings.

But what about current residences? According to the real estate Web site Trulia, the average income in East New York is $32,165. Based on the standard income qualification of 40x the rent, an affordable housing price for current residents is $804.13, How many of the new affordable rents will be under $1,000? Under $1,200?  According to the MIH rules, there should be some, but how many investors will drop multi-millions into a development to collect those rents?

New development is a good thing, but for those who are in the crosshairs, it’s never comfortable. New York City has plenty of luxury housing. The fact is, developers are running out of low-buy-in areas to develop. East Brooklyn seems to be the current target area, thanks to the EDC’s rezoning plans. We applaud Mayor De Blasio’s efforts to create and maintain affordable housing. In East Brooklyn, we just don’t see it happening in earnest overnight, or any time soon.


 

Brooklyn: Hollywood East?

Brooklyn: Hollywood East?

BSE Strip

Like television? So do we, and, it seems TV likes Brooklyn. Broadway Stages, the biggest film studio company in Brooklyn that you’ve never heard of, is growing faster than the famous literary Ailanthus tree. Most Brooklyners know about Steiner Studios, the long-time resident at the Navy Yard, and many have heard of CineMagic, and there are Kaufman Astoria and Silvercup in Queens. But there is perhaps a dozen or more smaller studios that are busy handling interior shots for the many TV shows and movies being shot in New York, and Broadway Stages, one of the biggest of those, is getting bigger.

Broadway Stages is home to interior shots for such TV hits as VEEP, Mr. Robot, Master of None, Blacklist, Blue Bloods, Madame Secretary, and many more. The company already has a half-dozen locations dotted across Greenpoint, with others in Long Island City and Middle Village, Queens. Now, according to the Real Deal, they are growing further. The studio, headquartered on Meserole Street in Greenpoint, will be combining six single-lot buildings on nearby Kingsland Avenue into one, increasing the floors of those one-, two-, and three-floor properties to six to and the usable floor space to 101,623 from 41,233. The reconstruction is scheduled to begin in the spring and take a year or more to complete.

In a separate purchase, Broadway Stages last month wrapped up a deal with Exxon-Mobile to buy a large empty lot around the corner from the Kingsland Avenue properties, at 378-392 Greenpoint Avenue. That deal, at $10.2 million, gives Broadway Stages another 160,000 (+/-) buildable square feet for further expansion down the road.

New York TV production has increased dramatically in the past decade, and Broadway Stages is taking advantage and getting ready for a lot more right here in Brooklyn.

 

 


 

2018 in Brooklyn: What to Expect

2018 in Brooklyn: What to Expect

Happy New Year to all! The past year was interesting inside and out of the real estate market, and it appears early on that the New Year will be no less so for Brooklyn real estate.

We’ve looked at sales data from the third quarter of 2017 and compared it to the previouTompkins Pls quarter and the previous year, and we can say that, while things aren’t moving as wildly as in the previous two years, the local market is holding steady.

 In the third quarter of 2017, multi-family homes in Brooklyn, those of two-to-four families, sold for an average of $421 per square foot. In our neck of the Brooklyn woods, Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens, Park Slope and the surrounding neighborhoods, the average prices per square foot were at the high end, with Cobble Hill leading the pack at about $864/sq. ft., followed by Carroll Gardens, $800, Boerum Hill, $719, and Park Slope, $693/sq. ft.

 Compared to the 2nd quarter, Cobble Hill was up 32.92%, from $650/sq. ft., Carroll Gardens was up 28.82%, from $621, and Park Slope was down 13.7%, from $803. However, in the Slope, twenty properties were sold in the third quarter vs. just six in Q2, and larger samples tend to pull averages down. Apparently, no multi-family homes sold in Boerum Hill in all of Q2.

 A year ago, the third-quarter 2016 price-per-square-foot list looked like this: Boerum Hill, $658; Park Slope, $826; Gowanus, $763; Clinton Hill, $709; and Carroll Gardens, $679. Cobble Hill tied with Williamsburg at $625.

 Like the stockKane St Doorways 300 w market, real estate prices don’t go straight up, or down. Based on what we see, the Brooklyn housing market should continue its generally steady rise in 2018, with areas a bit further away from downtown seeing prices rise more percentage-wise than in the recent past, and those closer to Manhattan holding steady, with average fluctuations based on the number and the quality of units changing hands.

 We wish you all a prosperous 2018 and believe it will be another good year for the Brooklyn real estate market.


 

 

 

A New Crown Jewel for Crown Heights?

A New Crown Jewel for Crown Heights?

The City Council has approved the redevelopment plan for the Bedford Union Armory in Crown Heights, a plan that would transform the armory into a sports and recreation center and add the development of a 414-unit condominium project, with 250 of those units earmarked as low-income housing, as well as office space for non-profits. The project would be a public/private partnership between the NYC Economic Development Corp. (NYCEDC) and BFC Partners, a private development company. The plan seems worthwhile, but like all development projects both public and private, there are (at least) as many against as there are for the project. Interior 1, captioned

On paper, including in the architects’ renderings, it’s a great use of the armory space, with basketball courts, a soccer field, and a swimming pool on (and in) the former military assembly floor. This would be paid for by the city. The city, though, would make money from the sale of the condos, which would defray the cost of the recreation center. However, many local residents see the project as a new phase of gentrification that could put their futures in the area at risk. Some politicians and advocacy groups feel it is inappropriate to turn city-owned property over to for-profit companies to make millions from.

In mid-November, the LegalInterior 2, captioned Aid Society filed a lawsuit against the project. Their public statement said, “From the start, this project has been flawed and offers little relief for the residents of a neighborhood that’s suffering from gentrification and skyrocketing rents. …Land that is fully owned by the public should serve an exclusive public purpose. Until the Bedford Union Armory development plan reflects that, we will continue to oppose it on behalf of our clients and other low-income New Yorkers who are in desperate need of affordable and permanent housing.

Despite the lawsuit, the approval by the City Council this month puts the project one step closer to becoming a reality. There are many more steps to be taken. Stay tuned.

The Brooklyn Navy Yard: The Before, During, and After

Brooklyn Navy Yard from the Air Kris Arnold  

The Brooklyn Navy Yard* area has played many critical parts in the history of the Borough, the city, and the country, dating all the way back to the Revolutionary War.

The yard sits on the edge of Wallabout Bay, a large cove in the East River between Williamsburg and Vinegar Hill. President John Adams, believing in the necessity of a strong Navy, in 1801 ordered the building of six navy yards in the new country, and Wallabout Bay was chosen as one of the sites. The yard was decommissioned in 1966. When it closed, it was the oldest industrial facility in New York State.

Before

The bay played a horrific part in the American Revolution. Having captured more rebels during the Battle of Brooklyn and in the roundups afterward than they could manage on land, the British loaded prisoners onto ships anchored or groNavy Yard hms-jersey-interiorunded in the East River. The biggest and most notorious of these was the HMS Jersey**. Built as a warship and later converted to a hospital ship, in 1780 it sat grounded and rotting in Wallabout Bay. Estimates put the deaths on this boat alone at perhaps eight thousand. (By comparison, approximately 4,500 rebels died in combat in the entire war.) It was called “The Hell Afloat.” The men who died in the squalid conditions in the hold of the ship were either simply thrown overboard or buried in mass “graves” in the mud of the bay’s floor during low tide. Many were later removed to a mass grave in Fort Greene Park, but bodies and bones have been exposed during various dredgings and excavations ever since.

During

In the final days of the Adams administration in 1801, Naval Secretary Benjamin Stoddert purchased an existing shipyard in Brooklyn from a private shipbuilder who had been working for the navy and other commercial interests. Stoddert had long wanted to bring shipbuilding in-house rather than pay private contractors, who often overcharged the goverNavy Yard dry-dock-1nment for their services. (Apparently, the $400 hammer has a lo-o-o-ng history.) Jefferson, who had been elected as the next President months before the deal was made, was not keen on increasing the size of the navy, and so the new navy yard was at first used for repairs and for conversions of local commercial ships to naval vessels rather than building new ones. Years after Jefferson’s presidency, the first ship to be built in Brooklyn, the USS Ohio, was begun in 1817 and launched in 1820.

The yard served the navy continuously from then until 1966, scoring several firsts along the way, including the first combat steamship, the USS Fulton II in 1837, and the navy’s first battleship, the USS Maine, launched in 1889. The Maine was blown up in Havana harbor in 1898, precipitating the Spanish-American War.

Other notable events from navy yard history are the establishment of the Naval Lyceum (1833, the precursor to the Naval Academy now at Annapolis, MD) by Commodore Matthew Perry, the development of ether anesthesia (1852) by naval doctor E.R. Squibb at the yard’s naval hospital (opened in 1838), and the launch of the USS Arizona (1915), famously sunk in the Pearl Harbor sneak attack (1941) that brought the U.S. into World War II. In addition, the first song ever sung on the radio was broadcast from the Navy Yard in 1907 to test a radio system newly installed on a ship docked at the yard. The song was “I love you truly,” sung by Eugenia Farrar, an opera singer.

The Brooklyn Navy Yard was decommissioned and closed in 1966, along with about ninety other military bases across the country. More than 9,000 jobs were lost with it.

After                          

When its history as a naval facility ended, the shipyard remained open as a private venture, rented to Seatrain Shipbuilding. The city converted the old navy office and quarters buildings to an industrial and office complex. The shipyard closed in 1979, and after another bumpy two deNavy Yard Bldg92cades, the city again stepped in, modernizing the infrastructure within the complex in 2001. That attracted the interest of bigger players, and in 2004 Steiner Studios opened its humongous TV and Film production sound stages, giving the yard a huge boost, including added jobs within the studio and attracting support services and related industries. Today approximately 400 tenants large and small are renting and operational, and numerous buildings remain to be refurbished. On the west side of the complex, a Wegman’s superstore is due to open in 2018.

The area south of the bay is still referred to by some few as Wallabout, though almost all Brooklynites consider it the northern end of Fort Greene. It’s surrounded by subway lines, though none run through the area. Five bus lines stop at or very near the various gates into the yard and serve the immediate neighborhood. And, should the BQX trolley line ever come to be built, it would run either by or through the yard. Housing prices in this area, as in all of Brooklyn, are on an upward trend. The Wegman’s opening should be an added attraction.

______________________________________________

*Opening photo of Navy Yard by  Kris Arnold, New York, USA – Brooklyn, Manhattan, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2027855  

** Photo is of an engraving of conditions on the HMS Jersey. (From the Library of Congress, in the Navy Yard’s BLDG 92 collection)

Industry City: The Rise, the Fall, the Resurrection

During the last decade of the 19th century, Irving T. Bush built a massive warehousing complex along the Gowanus Bay on land inherited from his father. The Bush family had owned an oil refinery, which Irving’s father sold to Standard Oil, and when he died, Irving received a huge inheritance. He bought the land back from Standard and began building warehouses to store the many products that were coming into and out of New York Harbor at the time. He soon built addition800px-Bush_Terminal_Fairfield_North_aerial_-_1958 resized w captional larger buildings and rented space to companies that needed it and added huge piers, each of which could accommodate the docking of four large cargo vessels and all the cargo they unloaded.

 After some years of success, Irving expanded his operation to include shipping the products he and his tenants were storing, adding more buildings and a network of railroad tracks, including a huge rail yard, and was soon loading and unloading products and materials to and from at least eight regional railroads, including the Baltimore & Ohio, the Erie-Lackawanna, the NY Central and others. He even had his own railroad company, the Bush Terminal Railroad (BTRR). Bush built a line of tracks from the terminal to existing Pennsylvania railroad tracks. At least two of the terminal railroad tracks curved past the warehouses and ended right at the water, where groups of entire cars were pushed onto car floats that were then guided across the harbor by tugboats to New Jersey, from where they carried their goods across the country.

 By the end of World War I, the terminal spread over twenty city blocks, has seven piers along more than 3,000 feet of waterfront and held more than 100 warehouse and manufacturing buildings, its own railroad, and upwards of 25,000 workers.

 Irving Bush died in 1948, and soIC Mini Golf w captionon after, external factors led to a fall-off in the shipping portion of the Bush Terminal Company’s business. Bush Terminal Company sold the buildings in 1963. The port remained active until 1974, while the buildings remained almost fully occupied by a rotating series of tenants through the 1990s.

 In 1956, a huge explosion rocked the entire neighborhood. Sparks from ironworkers making repairs in one of the pier sheds ignited materials below and the fire soon moved to coils of fuse material that exploded. The blast was felt miles away. Ten people were killed and hundreds injured.

The complex changed hands more than once, and finally sold in 1983 to a group that changed the name to Industry City. Today, Bush Terminal’s physical plant has been resurrected. Industry City is a sparkling wonder, with hundreds of tenants that include artists, design, media, retail, manufacturing, and technology companies, along with government agencies, non-profits, and of course, warehouse space. It’s also an entertainment venue, with such events as the Brooklyn Crush Wine and Artisanal Food Festival and Rock and Roll Playhouse, a free summer concert series, a brew festival, Table Tennis Tuesday, and many other events throughout the year.RR Car in IC captioned

That said, much of Industry City is currently empty or underused. The current owners have recently begun the process of rezoning the complex and its immediate area to allow for additional businesses to come in, to convert up to 272,000 square feet to hotel space, and renovating 387,000 square feet for academic use, 900,000 square feet for retail space, and 43,000 square feet for event space. The entire process up to the beginning of the work could take eighteen months or more.

For now, the area retains its industrial flavor, and the railroad tracks remain embedded along First Avenue, curving every block into one of the docks built between the wings of Bush’s original buildings.

 

 

Brooklyn’s Original Coffee Roasters

It seems like you can’t walk two blocks in Brownstone Brooklyn neighborhoods without passing a coffee roaster shop. In our Carroll Gardens area, D’Amico’s is the original, dating from long, long before anyone ever heard of Starbuck’s. Now we also have East One, a few blocks down Court Street, and there are so many others dotting the landscape throughout Brooklyn. Java Joe in Park Slope is a long-time fixture in that neighborhood, and all over the Borough, there’s Brooklyn Roasting Company, Uptown Roasters, BKG, Anchor Coffee, Cocoa Grinder, Supercrown, Sey Coffee, Kings Coffee Roasters, and on and on.Arbuckles-Coffee-Mills-and-Sugar-Refinery-1908 (1)

Most of us think of Brooklyn coffee roasters as a new millennial phenomenon, but in fact, at the turn of the last century, New York Harbor was the entry point for almost ninety percent of the coffee entering the country, and about two thirds of that was off-loaded onto the Brooklyn waterfront. Coffee beans filled the Empire Stores, a block-long warehouse on Water Street in DUMBO that has recently reopened as an office/retail/eating complex. The Arbuckle Coffee Company, which began operations in 1871, became the first to roast, bagEmpire Stores water side, and ship nationwide from the company’s factory on John Street at the foot of Adams Street, right at the river’s edge. This allowed the Arbuckle factory to receive and process boatloads of coffee from all over Central and South America. Brothers John and Charlie Arbuckle invented a production machine that did the roasting and grinding, and funneled the grinds into one-pound packages, then sealed and labeled the bags all in one operation. The bags were shipped via railroad and truck across the country. For a time, the Arbuckle factory was the most prolific coffee roaster and distributor in the world, and John Arbuckle was known as the coffee king. The company’s Arbuckle Ariosa was the first branded packaged coffee in the United States, and became known as “the coffee that won the west.” Empire Stores Then

John Arbuckle died in 1912. The Arbuckle coffee factory remained in operation in the shadow of the Manhattan Bridge through the 1930s. The company was sold to General Foods in 1937.

So, the next time you stop into or simply pass a neighborhood coffee roaster, know that these new millennium companies are following a long tradition of making great coffee in Brooklyn.

Is Brooklyn’s Business Boom an Empty Dream?

Is Brooklyn’s Business Boom an Empty Dream?

Brooklyn has been a strong magnet for residents for many years now, but what about the business community? Many former industrial waterfront areas in DUMBO, Williamsburg, and Greenpoint have been either retooled for or replaced with condos, none of which seem to have too much trouble finding eager buyers. The past few years have seen a push to create office space, as well.

Some big-name retailers have moved into downtown on Fulton Street to serve the new residents coming into all the nearby condos that have sprouted up. Well beyond downtown, the race to create office space is instead resulting in a glut of empty space. According to a recent article on Bloomberg.com, there are plans by various developers to build about seven million square feet of office space in the next few years, mainly in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and Sunset Park, as well as the old Watchtower Building in DUMBO. The article sites 23 projects due to open by 2020. That much space will require either a ton of small companies taking out leases or help from a few big companies that will take several floors of space at once. The problem experts are seeing is that the big guys don’t seem too eager to make the move.

Prices on Manhattan office space have plateaued, and there is room for negotiation there, so big companies with no real yen for Brooklyn have little incentive to pay for a big, expensive move and to uproot their employees for possibly newer digs and beautiful offices in a place that’s frankly not that easy to get to from Westchester, New Jersey, Connecticut, or even Manhattan and Queens. Big companies that have recently moved to the NYC area, including Facebook and Alphabet (Google), have settled into Manhattan, and those that have come to Brooklyn have put pieces of their businesses in rather than move the entire company.

Several commercial real estate experts interviewed for the Bloomberg article remain upbeat. Although the signing of a 100,000+ square-foot lease would be newsworthy and perhaps a shot in the arm, Andrew Hoan, the CEO of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, noted that Brooklyn has added jobs faster than any other borough, and related his feeling that not being dependent on large companies is “a good thing.”

So, bring on the office space, we say. As long as it’s being concentrated in otherwise unused or underused buildings like those in the navy yard or Sunset Park’s Industry City, it’s a plus for Brooklyn, and in time, we feel, for the patient developer as well.

Read the full article on Bloomberg.com:
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-05-04/brooklyn-as-the-next-hot-spot-for-new-york-offices-not-so-fast